Sunday, August 15, 2010

ATC Fun with Puffy Paint

I'm not sure where August went, but it's been some two months since my last post! Life has been busy, and if you're ever wondering what I'm up to you can always check out my Flickr account, which gets an update at least once a week. Last month I was experimenting with Tulip brand Puffy fabric paint.

Here are some ATCs I've made for the Milwaukee Artist Trading Card group's July theme Life's A Beach:
Bathing Beauties #4-6
You can see the full set here. The foamy wave texture was made with white Puffy paint swirled with my finger over the collaged images (Bathing Beauties faux postage from Ten Two Studios). I let the puffy paint dry over night and then hit it with an heat gun so the swirls puffed up to make the cool texture. Then I painted the swirls with several washes of blue & green acrylic paints. (The puffed paint acts like a sponge sucking up the color.) The embellishments are hand-spun yarn from my friend Kathi and vintage shell buttons.

Using the same technique for a completely different look, I made another set of ATCs inspired by the opening credits of the HBO series Treme, which includes vintage photos of New Orleans and family photos damaged by water and mold.
Lost Memories #1-3
You can see the full set here. This time I created the organic root-like texture by pressing two surfaces wet with white puffy paint together and pulling them apart again. I used the heat gun while the puffy paint was still wet, and it bubbled up more, making weird mold-like growth. And I used darker colors - purple, brown & green. The images are from Ten Two Studios' Octavia and Storyville collage sheets.

Pretty funky!

4 comments:

Terri Kahrs said...

They funky and FANTASTIC!!!! Who knew that plain, old puffy paint could make such magic when you add heat! Can't wait to give this technique a whirl. Thanks so much!!! Hugs, Terri xoxo

vintagepix said...

Can't wait to see what you make, Terri! :D Thanks for stopping by!

Mel said...

Your "Treme" puffy paint cards are just so completely awesome! It really replicates the idea of mold so perfectly, without looking "moldy"! :D Thanks for sharing the technique at the last meeting! :D

vintagepix said...

Thanks, Mel - how would puffy paint look on top of a citrasolv background? :D

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